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Graduate Programs and Careers

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Doctoral Programs

: A traditional doctoral program in mathematics, offering broad training in mathematical foundations and specialized training in a research area for future faculty in universities and colleges or careers in industry and government research agencies.

The Pure and Applied Mathematics Specialization requires at least 60 credits in mathematics numbered 6000 or higher, excluding MATH 6990 and MATH 7990. At least 6 credits must be selected from seminars or classes numbered 7000 or higher, and no more than 30 of the credits can be completed in MATH 7970 (Dissertation Research). The qualifying examination for this option is in Real Analysis. The dissertation should be a publishable, significant contribution to research in an area of mathematics.

: Data science, theoretical and applied statistics for students seeking careers in academia, industry, or government.

The Statistics Specialization requires at least 60 credits in statistics at the 6000 and 7000 level, excluding STAT 6990 and STAT 7990. With the permission of the student’s supervisory committee, some of these credits may be in mathematics or in another discipline. At least 6 credits must be selected from seminars and classes numbered 7000 and higher, and a maximum of 30 credits may be completed in STAT 7970 (Dissertation Research). Students in this specialization take a qualifying examination in Probability and Mathematical Statistics. The dissertation constitutes a publishable, significant contribution to research in statistics.

: Advanced training in mathematics and/or statistics in the context of another field of inquiry, such as biology, ecology, business, economics, engineering, or education. For faculty and research careers crossing boundaries between disciplines.

The Interdisciplinary Studies Specialization requires at least 60 credits numbered 6000 or higher, excluding MATH 7990, STAT 7990, MATH 6990, and STAT 6990. No more than 30 of the credits may be completed in MATH 7970 or STAT 7970 (Dissertation Research). At least 20 of the credits should be in mathematics and/or statistics, of which at least 6 should be in seminars and classes at the 7000 level. An additional 10 credits in the student’s chosen interdisciplinary area are also required. Students in this specialization may take a qualifying examination in Real Analysis or in Probability and Mathematical Statistics, depending on whether the majority of their coursework is in mathematics or in statistics. The student’s PhD supervisory committee should include two persons in the student’s selected interdisciplinary area, and the comprehensive examination should have a significant interdisciplinary component. The dissertation for a student in this specialization should involve the development and application of mathematical or statistical methods to solve problems in the chosen interdisciplinary area, and should be publishable in journals in that area.

: Foundations in mathematics and/or statistics coupled with pedagogical training and experiences, designed to prepare students to teach at primarily undergraduate institutions.

The College Teaching Specialization requires at least 60 credits in mathematics courses numbered 6000 or higher, excluding MATH 7990 and MATH 6990, of which no more than 20 can be  completed in MATH 7970 (Dissertation Research). At least 6 credits should be selected from classes and seminars at the 7000 level, and 6 credits of MATH 7910 (College Teaching Internship) are also required. Students in this specialization take a qualifying examination in Real Analysis. The student’s dissertation in this specialization may take several forms, including a traditional, publishable contribution to some area of mathematics; a significant contribution in the area of mathematics education; or an exposition of important mathematical theories and their historic relationships in an area of the student’s choosing.

Masters Programs

: Prepares students to work as mathematicians in government, business, and industry and serves as a “stepping stone” to doctoral programs in mathematics or related subjects.

This program prepares students to work as mathematicians in government, business, and industry. This degree may also be a “stepping stone” for students who ultimately wish to pursue a doctorate in mathematics or a closely related subject.

This degree requires 30 credits of approved coursework at or above the 5000 level. At least 18 of these credits must be at the 6000 level or above, excluding MATH 6990 and MATH 7990 (Continuing Graduate Advisement) and MATH 7910 (College Teaching Internship). Generally, most of the coursework will be in mathematics, but the student’s supervisory committee may approve courses in statistics, physics, engineering, or any other discipline, if it seems such coursework is appropriate for the student’s program of study.

The MS in mathematics has three options. The Plan A or the thesis option requires taking 6 credits of MATH 6970 (Thesis and Research) and working with a faculty member on a substantial research project. The research must be presented in a thesis, which must be approved by the student’s supervisory committee and the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. An oral defense of the thesis must be arranged through the School of Graduate Studies.

The Plan B or project option requires taking 3 credits of MATH 6970 and working with a faculty member on a smaller research project. A written report of the research must be approved by the student’s supervisory committee. An oral defense of the report must be scheduled through the School of Graduate Studies.

The third option of the MS in Mathematics requires only coursework, and is called the Plan C option. This option is only for students simultaneously working on degrees in other departments.

All students in the MS program in Mathematics must pass a written qualifying examination covering the introductory analysis and advanced calculus material presented in MATH 4200, MATH 5210, and MATH 5220. Students may take this exam before beginning formal coursework in the MS program, and must take the exam at the end of the first full year of matriculation. The exam is typically given twice a year, in May and October. Matriculated students who fail on their first try must pass the exam at the next scheduled opportunity. A detailed exam syllabus is contained in the Graduate Handbook, available from the department.

: Applied statistics and data science for careers in government, business, and industry, as well as preparation for a variety of doctoral programs (statistics, computer science, economics, biology, ecology, natural resources).

This program is primarily designed to prepare students for careers in business, industry, and federal, state, and local government. Students pursuing graduate degrees in other disciplines, such as biology, natural resources, engineering, business, economics, epidemiology, and the social sciences, may elect to earn an MS in statistics concurrent with their other degree programs. For most students, the MS in statistics will prove sufficient for career preparation. However, some graduates may ultimately pursue a doctorate in statistics, biostatistics, or a closely related discipline.

This degree requires 30 credits of approved coursework at or above the 5000 level. At least 18 credits must be at the 6000 level or above, excluding STAT 6990 and STAT 7990 (Continuing Graduate Advisement). All students must take STAT 6710 and STAT 6720(Mathematical Statistics I and II). Generally, most of the coursework will be in statistics, but the student’s supervisory committee may approve courses in mathematics, biology, economics, or any other discipline if it deems such coursework to be appropriate for the student’s program of study.

The MS in Statistics has Plan A (thesis), Plan B (report), and Plan C (coursework only) options. The Plan A and Plan B options require students to work with a faculty member on a research project, taking 6 or 3 credits of STAT 6970, respectively, and presenting the results of the research in a written report. For both the Plan A and Plan B options, the report must be approved by the student’s supervisory committee. A Plan A report (thesis) must also be approved by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. Both Plan A and Plan B reports require an oral defense that must be scheduled through the School of Graduate Studies.

There is no qualifying examination for students in the MS program in Statistics. The qualifying requirement is that students must earn a B or better for both semesters of either the MATH 5710/MATH 5720 sequence or the STAT 6710/STAT 6720 sequence.

The Plan C option of the MS program in Statistics is only for students simultaneously working on a degree in another department. Students in this option must pass both MATH 5710 and MATH 5720, or both STAT 6710 and STAT 6720 with a grade of B+ or better.

: Applied and computational mathematics and statistics for students seeking employment in government, business, and industry.

The Industrial Mathematics master’s degree is designed to broaden the learning experiences and job opportunities for master’s students in mathematics. The program of study incorporates fundamental applied mathematics and interdisciplinary coursework in support of an industrial internship experience.

This degree requires 36 credits of coursework at or above the 5000 level. At least 15 of these credits must be completed in MATH courses at the 6000 level or above. Additionally, students must complete a total of 9 credits outside of Mathematics which complement their internship and final project. A maximum of 3 of these credits may be taken at the 5000-level (i.e., one 3-credit course in another department). See the departmental website or the Graduate Handbook for more detailed information about coursework requirements.

Students in the MS program in Industrial Mathematics are required to pass the Advanced Calculus examination (see the Master of Science in Mathematics examination requirements) or an examination based on material presented in four core courses chosen by the student during the first year. The exam, which can be taken before or at the beginning of the student’s second year in  the program, is usually given in May or October. Students are also required to complete a final project based on work done during an internship, either with a company or possibly with another department on campus. The project will include a technical write-up suitable to the industry/field, and presentation to the involved faculty and students in the program. This follows the Plan B option listed for the Master of Science in Mathematics degree.

The Departmental Graduate Committee supervises all MS and MMath students until a supervisory committee for the student is established and approved. Prior to advancement to candidacy, students in Plan B options for the MS degree in mathematics and statistics must pass an examination in English writing. This exam is administered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Broad background in mathematics, statistics and pedagogy designed specifically for secondary teachers.

This program is designed specifically for secondary school teachers of mathematics. The purpose of this degree is to provide students with a broad background in mathematics.

This program requires at least 36 credits approved by the Graduate Committee within the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. At least 21 of these credits must come from mathematics classes numbered above 5000, and the remaining credits must be chosen from approved courses offered within the Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services. The GPA for the 36 credits and for the 21 math credits must be at least 3.0.

All students in the Master of Mathematics program must pass a written qualifying examination. They may take the Advanced Calculus Exam, covering the introductory analysis and advanced calculus material presented in MATH 4200, MATH 5210, and MATH 5220, or the qualifying exam in Mathematics Teaching. Students may take these exams before beginning formal coursework in the program, but must take these exams before the end of the first year of matriculation. The Advanced Calculus exam is typically given twice a year, in May and October, while the Mathematics Teaching exam is given in May. Matriculated students who fail on their first try must pass the exam at the next scheduled opportunity.

 Program  Credits  Exam or Other
 qualifying requirements
 Research
 M.S. Mathematics  30 credits (at least 18 credits
 at a 6000 level or above
 including research) 
 Comprehensive exam in Advanced Calculus   Plan A: 6 credits research  
 Plan B: 3 credits research
 M.S. Statistics  30 credits (at least 18 credits
 at a 6000 level or above
 including research) 
 B or better for both semester of either Math 5710 & 5720 or
STAT 6710 & 6720.
STAT 6710 & 6720 is required for all students
 Plan A: 6 credits research
 Plan B: 3 credits research
 M.S. Industrial Mathematics   36 credits (at least 15 credits at
6000 level including reseach,
9 credits outside Math & Stat)
B or better in one of Math 5410 or 5420, one of
Math 5610 or 5620 and STAT 5100.
Professional internship (MATH 6250) also required.
Plan B: 3 credits research
 Master of Mathematics  36 credits  Comprehensive exam in Mathematics Teaching 
 or Comprehensive exam in Advanced Calculus
 No research
 credits required
 Ph.D.  45 with prior Masters
 72 without prior Masters,
(no more than 15 at 5000 level)
 Comprehensive exam
 determined by committee 
 18 - 24 credits research